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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/02/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [October 2, 2024 | 7pm ET] Research in disability studies can help art educators reframe ways of engaging with disability issues. Learn about the use of disability arts to engage learners in critical visual literacy and imagery production focused on topics of disability. Discover critical approaches to language and decentering normalcy to create inclusive learning spaces for all.


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    Disabilities Studies and Art Education: Reframing Student and Teacher Engagement
    Wednesday, October 2, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Research in disability studies can help art educators reframe ways of engaging with disability issues. Learn about the use of disability arts to engage learners in critical visual literacy and imagery production focused on topics of disability. Discover critical approaches to language and decentering normalcy to create inclusive learning spaces for all. 

    Kelly Gross

    Assistant Professor of Art and Design Education, Northern Illinois University

    Kelly M. Gross is an assistant professor of art and design education at Northern Illinois University and a former special education and K–8 art teacher. She is working on several research projects that focus on the intersection of art education, special education, and disability studies. Recently, she has been examining the potentialities of AI in art education. 

    jt Eisenhauer Richardson

    Assistant Professor of Art and Design Education, Northern Illinois University

    jt Eisenhauer Richardson is an associate professor of art education in the Department of Arts Administration, Education, and Policy at The Ohio State University. They are an affiliated faculty member with the Disability Studies Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization and serve as Chair of the Digital Learning Committee. 

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 09/11/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [September 11, 2024 | 7pm ET] Unlock the power of video games as catalysts for social justice and transformative education! Join us for this thought-provoking webinar and explore the intersection of gaming, social justice, and education. Learn how video games can be harnessed to inspire critical thinking, empathy, and positive social change. Dig into what makes games intriguing and engaging for learners and see through an educator’s lens how we can use these key ideas for success in an arts-based classroom. Together, let’s level up our understanding of the educational potential within the gaming world!


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    Radical and Transformative Collaboration (and Fun!) Through Social Impact Video Game Design
    Wednesday, September 11, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Unlock the power of video games as catalysts for social justice and transformative education! Join us for this thought-provoking webinar and explore the intersection of gaming, social justice, and education. Learn how video games can be harnessed to inspire critical thinking, empathy, and positive social change. Dig into what makes games intriguing and engaging for learners and see through an educator’s lens how we can use these key ideas for success in an arts-based classroom. Together, let’s level up our understanding of the educational potential within the gaming world!

    Renee E. Jackson

    Educational Studies, Concordia University, Montréal, Canada; Associate Professor & Program Head, Art Education, Tyler School of Art and Architecture

    Renee Jackson is an artist, critical feminist pedagogue, and scholar whose research interests relate to the disruption of oppressive mechanisms in education and the integration of game design, gameplay, and playful practices as collaborative art forms and learning tools in support of this goal. She is an associate professor of art education at Tyler School of Art and Architecture.

    Stevi Martyniuk

    Visual Arts Teacher, Burnsview Secondary School, Delta, British Columbia

    Stevi Martyniuk began her teaching career as an English teacher in a rural town in South Korea. There she learned to build and code her own games and advocated for their usefulness in the classroom. Currently, Stevi is a secondary art and English studies educator. Her research and teaching areas include video game studies, media arts and digital design, and creative writing.

    Steve Ciampaglia

    Associate Professor of Art, Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Institute of Art

    Steve Ciampaglia is a new media community artist and associate professor of art and art education. He has presented his artwork and research at MIT, Stanford University, and Columbia University. He has been published in the Harvard Educational ReviewStudies in Art Education, and the Journal of Social Theory in Art Education.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/07/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [August 7, 2024 | 7pm ET] Join us for an exciting webinar that weaves traditional craftsmanship with contemporary creativity in fiber arts. We’ll explore innovative approaches for introducing new fiber arts projects to elementary, middle, and high school learners that are focused on accessible materials, diverse contemporary and traditional craft artists, and literacy. Come away with lesson inspiration; a better understanding of how you can explore fiber arts in your classroom; and information on where to find materials, recommended equipment, and tools, as well as overcoming budget constraints for fiber arts, storage options, and so much more!

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    Fiber Arts for All
    Wednesday, August 7, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Join us for an exciting webinar that weaves traditional craftsmanship with contemporary creativity in fiber arts. We’ll explore innovative approaches for introducing new fiber arts projects to elementary, middle, and high school learners that are focused on accessible materials, diverse contemporary and traditional craft artists, and literacy. Come away with lesson inspiration; a better understanding of how you can explore fiber arts in your classroom; and information on where to find materials, recommended equipment, and tools, as well as overcoming budget constraints for fiber arts, storage options, and so much more!

    Frann Diamond Paige

    Elementary Art Educator, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School District, Winston-Salem, NC

    Frann Diamond Paige is an elementary art educator in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School District in Winston-Salem, NC. She graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with a BS in Graphic Arts. In her previous life she was an art and print production manager for Condé Nast. Always interested in becoming an art teacher, Frann changed careers and has now been teaching for 20 years. She is an NCAEA 2024 Art Educator of the Year and has served on the NCAEA board for 8 years. In her free time, Frann enjoys camping with her husband, knitting, and painting with watercolor

    Latonya Hicks

    Visual Arts Secondary Integration Coordinator, Pinellas County, Pinellas County, FL

    Latonya Hicks is a visual arts secondary integration coordinator in Pinellas County, FL. She is responsible for guiding 6–12 Pinellas County art teachers in IB and PreAP/AP Art and Design and teaching professional development. Her guiding principle revolves around the adage “never stop learning!” For 17 years, Latonya has engaged students from kindergarten to adult learners. In support endeavors, she holds roles and membership in the AP Art and Design exam, Development Committee, and mentor program, and she has served as the FAEA President.

    Lisa Kriner

    Professor of Art and Fibers, Berea College, Berea College, KY

    Lisa L. Kriner is a professor of studio art and serves as the Morris B. Belknap Chair in Fine Arts at Berea College in Kentucky. She earned her BS in Textile Technology and Design at North Carolina State University and her MFA in Fibers at The University of Kansas. Lisa’s fiber art visually explores evidence left by the passage of time and patterns of daily experience and personal data.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 07/10/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [July 10, 2024 | 7pm ET] Empower your learners to become innovative stewards of our shared planet through art! Empty bottles, worn toys, and plastic shopping bags often end up as landfill overflow polluting the environment. Inspired by the works of art collectives like the Washed Ashore Project upcycling marine debris into impactful sculptures, this webinar explores the intersection of creativity and conservation through eco-art education for K-12 learners. Join us to discover practical approaches for building students’ artistic talents while cultivating their ecological awareness and developing their social consciousness toward environmental sustainability.


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    Connecting Creativity and Conservation: An Overview of Eco-Art Education 
    Wednesday, July 10, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Empower your learners to become innovative stewards of our shared planet through art! Empty bottles, worn toys, and plastic shopping bags often end up as landfill overflow polluting the environment. Inspired by the works of art collectives like the Washed Ashore Project upcycling marine debris into impactful sculptures, this webinar explores the intersection of creativity and conservation through eco-art education for K-12 learners. Join us to discover practical approaches for building students’ artistic talents while cultivating their ecological awareness and developing their social consciousness toward environmental sustainability.

    Sheng Kuan Chung

    Professor of Art Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Houston

    Sheng Kuan Chung has authored more than 60 academic articles in the field of art education and received two prestigious awards from the National Art Education Association and the United States Society for Education Through Art for his scholarship in art education. His research interests focus on critical visual culture and art education pertaining to justice, inclusion, and equity.

    Kathy J. Brown

    Endowed Assistant Professor of Art Education, University of Arkansas

    Kathy J. Brown is an endowed assistant professor of art education at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. She is a published researcher, a former K–12 art educator, and a practicing artist. In 2023, Kathy was selected as a Carter Community Artist for the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 06/20/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [June 20, 2024 | 7pm ET] The dynamic between artists as educators and educators as artists can bring diverse perspectives to the education field. Artists as educators may emphasize creativity, while educators as artists can integrate their artistic skills into teaching methods, enhancing the learning experience. Both approaches contribute to the holistic well-being of the arts educator. Join us as we explore these relationships in this NAEA Open Studio Conversation.

    NAEA Open Studio Conversation | Balancing Acts: Strategies for Preservice Art Educators to Thrive as Artists and Instructors 
    Thursday, June 20, 2024 | 7pm ET
    Cost: FREE!

    Submit your questions for panelists here by June 10.

    The dynamic between artists as educators and educators as artists can bring diverse perspectives to the education field. Artists as educators may emphasize creativity, while educators as artists can integrate their artistic skills into teaching methods, enhancing the learning experience. Both approaches contribute to the holistic well-being of the arts educator. Join us as we explore these relationships in this NAEA Open Studio Conversation. 

    Please note that participation in this live event or recording does not include NAEA professional learning credit. 

    Emily Saleh

    Visual Arts & Design Educator, West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District, Princeton Junction, NJ

    Emily Saleh, a visual artist, designer, and educator, passionately serves as a 4th- and 5th-grade art and design educator in central New Jersey, dedicated to nurturing learners and empathic citizens through art. With an honors BFA from Syracuse University, Emily’s philosophy emphasizes authentic, individualized, and peaceful learning experiences for all, infusing compassion and joy into the art studio. As the current Eastern Region Middle Level Division Director for NAEA, she champions the transformative power of art in fostering understanding, conscientiousness, and empathy. Emily’s advisory roles for nonprofits and district strategic leadership reflect her commitment to community engagement. She leads community art initiatives domestically and abroad, spanning topics from sustainability, service, literacy, and integrated arts. Emily thrives on collaboration, connection, and innovative art, celebrating creativity’s profound role in realizing our dreams. When not organizing or creating, she enjoys laughter-filled conversations about cats, food, Grey’s Anatomy, and travel adventures. 

    Maria Knuckley Robinson

    Director of Studio Art and Pre-Art Therapy, Salem College, Winston-Salem, NC

    Maria Knuckley Robinson holds undergraduate degrees in business administration and art studio/design, a Masters of Arts Teaching in Art Education, National Board Teacher Certification, and an Education Doctorate Degree in Curriculum and Instruction. She is currently working on an MFA in Painting at SCAD to improve her own work in combining painting, printmaking, textiles, and mixed-media approaches. Maria has extensive training in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, pottery, mixed media, photography, film, metal jewelry, 3D printing, and STEAM curriculum development. She is actively involved with Advanced Placement Studio Art and Design as a Table Leader and Consultant, NAEA as an At-Large Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Commissioner, and the South Carolina Department of Education’s Arts Assessment Program as an assessor, item writer, and professional development instructor. She has a consulting business called Artistry & Assessment; she travels to schools around the country to assist in developing growth in arts assessment practices. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/05/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [June 5, 2024 | 7pm ET] NAEA is committed to supporting our current and future visual arts, design, and media arts educators. Pandemic burnout, early retirements, rise in school violence, lack of clear career pathways, and ongoing pedagogical cultural wars—among other challenges—make the recruitment and retention of art teachers increasingly more difficult. To better understand and address the obstacles that current and future art educators face, as well as the growing issue of educator staffing shortages, the NAEA Board of Directors has formed a national “Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force.” The Task Force is tasked with investigating the obstacles and opportunities to entering and serving the field of visual arts, design, and media arts education, and engage with the membership, peer organizations, and external experts to gather data and draft a report of findings and recommendations for short, mid, and long-term action to be presented to the Board. Join us as members of the NAEA Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force share their findings and recommendations for the association and the field.


     

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    Addressing Teacher Recruitment and Retention

    Wednesday, June 5, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    NAEA is committed to supporting our current and future visual arts, design, and media arts educators. Pandemic burnout, early retirements, rise in school violence, lack of clear career pathways, and ongoing pedagogical cultural wars—among other challenges—make the recruitment and retention of art teachers increasingly more difficult. To better understand and address the obstacles that current and future art educators face, as well as the growing issue of educator staffing shortages, the NAEA Board of Directors has formed a national “Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force.” The Task Force is tasked with investigating the obstacles and opportunities to entering and serving the field of visual arts, design, and media arts education, and engage with the membership, peer organizations, and external experts to gather data and draft a report of findings and recommendations for short, mid, and long-term action to be presented to the Board. Join us as members of the NAEA Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force share their findings and recommendations for the association and the field.

    Theresa McGee

    Art and Digital Media Educator, Hinsdale Middle School, Illinois

    Theresa McGee is a passionate art educator who recently finished her term on the NAEA Board of Directors as the Western Region Vice President. She currently serves as co-chair of the NAEA Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force and is deeply committed to developing solutions for the problems currently plaguing the profession. As a National Board Certified educator, McGee has taught Art & Digital Media to all grades from K–8. She is frequent presenter both online and at local, regional, and national conferences covering topics on technology integration, design thinking, and literacy. She has served the Illinois Art Education Association as President, Vice President, Webmaster, and Webinar Coordinator.

    Cathy Rosamond

    Chair of Art Education, School of Visual Arts, New York, NY

    Cathy Rosamond has an extensive background in higher education teaching and research, as well as museum education for K–12 students. At NAEA, she serves on the Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Commission and is the co-chair of the Teacher Retention and Recruitment Task Force. Her scholarship interests include artistic research, specifically in investigations that focus on diverse approaches to inquiry.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    [May 23, 2024] - Join us for this Open Studio Conversation covering the basics of submitting a presentation proposal for the upcoming 2025 NAEA National Convention. Walk through the proposal submission process with Director of Learning and Program Development, Laura Grundler, and Director of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Special Initiatives, Ray Yang, and learn firsthand what you’ll need to prep your submission—plus tips to make it easier and more effective. Bring your questions and walk away ready to submit your presentation proposal!

    NAEA Open Studio Conversation: Submitting Your Presentation Proposal for NAEA25 
    Thursday, May 23, 2024 
    Cost: FREE!

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    Join us for this Open Studio Conversation covering the basics of submitting a presentation proposal for the upcoming 2025 NAEA National Convention. Walk through the proposal submission process with Director of Learning and Program Development, Laura Grundler, and Director of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Special Initiatives, Ray Yang, and learn firsthand what you’ll need to prep your submission—plus tips to make it easier and more effective. Bring your questions and walk away ready to submit your presentation proposal!

    Please note that participation in this live event or recording does not include NAEA professional learning credit. 

    Laura Grundler

    NAEA Director of Learning and Program Development

    Ray Yang

    Director of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (ED&I) and Special Initiatives

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    [May 9, 2024] Join us for a Town Hall Conversation with educators as they share invaluable insights and advice for preservice and early career art educators, offering candid reflections on what they wish they knew before embarking on their teaching journeys. Discover practical tips and strategies to navigate the joys and challenges of the classroom, empowering you to thrive as an art educator.

    NAEA Town Hall: What I Wish I Knew Before I Started Teaching: Advice For Preservice & Early Career Teachers 
    Thursday, May 9, 2024
    Cost: FREE!

    Join us for a Town Hall conversation with educators as they share invaluable insights and advice for preservice and early career art educators, offering candid reflections on what they wish they knew before embarking on their teaching journey. Discover practical tips and strategies to navigate the joys and challenges of the classroom, empowering you to thrive as an art educator.

    Please note that participation in this Town Hall does not include NAEA professional development credit.

    Vernon Fains

    Secondary Art Educator, Baltimore County Public Schools

    Vernon Fains attended the Maryland Institute College of Art where he earned his BFA in Visual Communications. He earned a BS in Art History and K12 Certification at Towson University, where he also received his MA in Art Education. He currently teaches Grades 68 and students in the Communication and Learning Supports for Students With Autism (CALS) Program. He is the department chair, as well as a cross country and track and field coach, at Pine Grove Middle. Vernon also serves as a mentor to emerging and aspiring educators in the middle school classroom and as an adjunct professor with Towson University 

    Vernon has recently taken on the role with his state association as Vice President of Advocacy. His work in advocacy began as a Teachers Association of Baltimore County board member and a board liaison for the Minority Affairs Committee. He is part of the advisory team with the Anti-Racist Art Teachers. He also serves on the leadership team with National Education Association Leaders for Just Schools, which focuses on developing just and equitable learning environments for students and educators. 

    Vernon believes art education is an essential part of a holistic learning journey for students of all ages. 

    Abby Birhanu

    Secondary Art Educator, School District of Clayton

    Abby Birhanu (she/her) is an artist and educator with a passion for fostering creativity and confidence in her students. With experience teaching middle and high school, she believes deeply in the transformative power of art education. Abby embraces choice-based art and Teaching for Artistic Behavior (TAB) pedagogies. 

    Her involvement in the Fulbright Teachers Exchange Program, where she served as an exchange teacher to the United Kingdom, was a pivotal experience that reinforced her dedication to cross-cultural learning and teaching. Abby loves traveling and actively takes opportunities to engage in educational and cultural exchange opportunities. 

    As an advocate for equity and inclusivity in education, Abby is committed to antiracist, antibias, and culturally responsive teaching. She strives to cultivate global citizens who appreciate and contribute to our diverse interconnected world community. 

    Devon Calvert

    K-3 Art Educator, School District of Milton; NAEA Elementary Division Director

    Devon Calvert is an art educator who has shared his love of all art historyrelated with his K3 students in Milton, Wisconsin, for the past 9 years. He is involved in the National Art Education Association, where he is Elementary Division Director. Devon has presented at the state and national levels on digital and contemporary art in the elementary classroom. 

    When he is not busy teaching, Devon enjoys hiking; painting; watching movies; remodeling his home; and hanging out with his wife, Julia, and puppy, Birdie. 

    Jesse Todero

    K-3 Art Teacher, Muhlenberg School District; NAEA Preservice Division Director

    Jesse Todero is a K–3 art teacher currently finishing her 3rd year. Jesse completed her undergraduate degree from the Kutztown University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Science in Art Education, Bachelor of Art in Art History, and a minor in crafts. She is serving on the National Art Education Association Board of Directors as the Preservice Division Director. Jesse is also working toward her masters degree in art education through The Art of Education University. At the core of her teaching philosophy is student-centered learning and building a strong classroom community. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [May 8, 2024] Documentation and portfolios are multifaceted visual records that track, analyze, and represent student growth. The depth of documentation is strengthened through photography, audio recordings, transcriptions of their language, and dedicated time for reflection (for students and teachers). Visual arts portfolios capture the imagination, wonderings, and artmaking actions nurtured through student-centered art education practices and offer connections across grade levels and disciplines. Additionally, student portfolios are an advocacy tool providing insight into student thinking. The webinar presenters will share pre-primary, primary, and preK–12 strategies for organizing and sharing student progress with the broader community. Philosophical influences of Reggio Emilia, TAB, IB, and AP will also be discussed.


     

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    Documenting Student Growth: Portfolio Development Through Student-Centered Art Education Practices

    Wednesday, May 8, 2024
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Documentation and portfolios are multifaceted visual records that track, analyze, and represent student growth. The depth of documentation is strengthened through photography, audio recordings, transcriptions of their language, and dedicated time for reflection (for students and teachers). Visual arts portfolios capture the imagination, wonderings, and artmaking actions nurtured through student-centered art education practices and offer connections across grade levels and disciplines. Additionally, student portfolios are an advocacy tool providing insight into student thinking. The webinar presenters will share pre-primary, primary, and preK–12 strategies for organizing and sharing student progress with the broader community. Philosophical influences of Reggio Emilia, TAB, IB, and AP will also be discussed.

    Wendy Robbins

    Atelierista, Ashley Hall School, Charleston, SC

    Wendy Robbins has worked in the early childhood field for over 20 years, serving as a teacher, program owner, and now atelierista at Ashley Hall School in Charleston, SC, where she works with children ages 2 through kindergarten. Wendy holds an Med in Fine Arts and the Regio Approach, and a BA in Children’s Fine Arts. She has a particular interest in music and movement as languages and incorporates these experiences as opportunities for creative expression and project work.

    Tina Hirsig

    K–6 Art Educator, Ashley Hall School, Charleston, SC

    Tina Hirsig earned a BS in Education from Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois, and a MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College’s self-designed graduate program. Tina’s degree has combined education philosophy and practices with interdisciplinary art. Today her teaching studio is choice-based (TAB) with an emphasis on student growth for K–6.

    Michelle Cobb

    AP Studio Art Reader; Art Educator and Art Chair, Georgetown Day School, Washington, D.C.

    Michelle Cobb began her career as a designer for Time Life and later became the first Black art director for Sports Illustrated. She holds an MFA from George Washington University and a BA from Skidmore College. Currently serving as the art chair at Georgetown Day School, she has been teaching art for over 25 years. Michelle’s graphic design work has also been acquired by Stanford University’s Black Graphic Design Artist Initiative.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [April 17, 2024] This webinar will focus on various ways choice can be implemented in the classroom through the structure of curriculum, digital spaces, physical environments, and classroom routines. We will share examples of skill builders, boot camps, and thematic-based challenges, and strategies to structure student-facing learning management systems and physical stations for different materials to engage students in their own learning journeys. You will also learn simple yet effective classroom routines to promote student autonomy and success.



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    Structure for Success in a Choice-Driven Classroom

    Wednesday, April 17, 2024
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    This webinar will focus on various ways choice can be implemented in the classroom through the structure of curriculum, digital spaces, physical environments, and classroom routines. We will share examples of skill builders, boot camps, and thematic-based challenges, and strategies to structure student-facing learning management systems and physical stations for different materials to engage students in their own learning journeys. You will also learn simple yet effective classroom routines to promote student autonomy and success.

    Janine Campbell

    Visual Arts Teacher, Byron Center Public Schools, Michigan

    Janine Campbell has been teaching students in a middle school classroom since 2004. Her students have received local and national recognition in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, and she was honored as the Michigan Art Education Association Middle Level Educator of the Year in 2015, and the National Art Education Association Western Region Middle Level Educator of the Year in 2015. She has also received the Artsonia Leadership Award in 2019, and the MACUL Innovative Teacher of the Year Award in 2020.

    Stevie Ballow

    Art Educator and TAB Studio Director, Shady Oak Primary School, Richmond, TX

    Stevie Ballow has been teaching art for over 20 years. She is currently the TAB Studio Director at Shady Oak Primary School in Richmond, Texas, and she has presented on creativity and artmaking at education, art, and disaster recovery conferences nationwide. With a degree in biomedical engineering, Ballow uses her expertise to teach students how to "think like artists."

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.