Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Category
Search by Format
Sort By
Search by Type
Search by Category
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/05/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [June 5, 2024 | 7pm ET] NAEA is committed to supporting our current and future visual arts, design, and media arts educators. Pandemic burnout, early retirements, rise in school violence, lack of clear career pathways, and ongoing pedagogical cultural wars—among other challenges—make the recruitment and retention of art teachers increasingly more difficult. To better understand and address the obstacles that current and future art educators face, as well as the growing issue of educator staffing shortages, the NAEA Board of Directors has formed a national “Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force.” The Task Force is tasked with investigating the obstacles and opportunities to entering and serving the field of visual arts, design, and media arts education, and engage with the membership, peer organizations, and external experts to gather data and draft a report of findings and recommendations for short, mid, and long-term action to be presented to the Board. Join us as members of the NAEA Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force share their findings and recommendations for the association and the field.


     

    image

    Addressing Teacher Recruitment and Retention

    Wednesday, June 5, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    NAEA is committed to supporting our current and future visual arts, design, and media arts educators. Pandemic burnout, early retirements, rise in school violence, lack of clear career pathways, and ongoing pedagogical cultural wars—among other challenges—make the recruitment and retention of art teachers increasingly more difficult. To better understand and address the obstacles that current and future art educators face, as well as the growing issue of educator staffing shortages, the NAEA Board of Directors has formed a national “Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force.” The Task Force is tasked with investigating the obstacles and opportunities to entering and serving the field of visual arts, design, and media arts education, and engage with the membership, peer organizations, and external experts to gather data and draft a report of findings and recommendations for short, mid, and long-term action to be presented to the Board. Join us as members of the NAEA Art Education Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force share their findings and recommendations for the association and the field.

    Theresa McGee

    Art and Digital Media Educator, Hinsdale Middle School, Illinois

    Theresa McGee is a passionate art educator who recently finished her term on the NAEA Board of Directors as the Western Region Vice President. She currently serves as co-chair of the NAEA Teacher Recruitment and Retention Task Force and is deeply committed to developing solutions for the problems currently plaguing the profession. As a National Board Certified educator, McGee has taught Art & Digital Media to all grades from K–8. She is frequent presenter both online and at local, regional, and national conferences covering topics on technology integration, design thinking, and literacy. She has served the Illinois Art Education Association as President, Vice President, Webmaster, and Webinar Coordinator.

    Cathy Rosamond

    Chair of Art Education, School of Visual Arts, New York, NY

    Cathy Rosamond has an extensive background in higher education teaching and research, as well as museum education for K–12 students. At NAEA, she serves on the Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Commission and is the co-chair of the Teacher Retention and Recruitment Task Force. Her scholarship interests include artistic research, specifically in investigations that focus on diverse approaches to inquiry.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/08/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [May 8, 2024 | 7pm ET] Documentation and portfolios are multifaceted visual records that track, analyze, and represent student growth. The depth of documentation is strengthened through photography, audio recordings, transcriptions of their language, and dedicated time for reflection (for students and teachers). Visual arts portfolios capture the imagination, wonderings, and artmaking actions nurtured through student-centered art education practices and offer connections across grade levels and disciplines. Additionally, student portfolios are an advocacy tool providing insight into student thinking. The webinar presenters will share pre-primary, primary, and preK–12 strategies for organizing and sharing student progress with the broader community. Philosophical influences of Reggio Emilia, TAB, IB, and AP will also be discussed.


     

    image

    Documenting Student Growth: Portfolio Development Through Student-Centered Art Education Practices

    Wednesday, May 8, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Documentation and portfolios are multifaceted visual records that track, analyze, and represent student growth. The depth of documentation is strengthened through photography, audio recordings, transcriptions of their language, and dedicated time for reflection (for students and teachers). Visual arts portfolios capture the imagination, wonderings, and artmaking actions nurtured through student-centered art education practices and offer connections across grade levels and disciplines. Additionally, student portfolios are an advocacy tool providing insight into student thinking. The webinar presenters will share pre-primary, primary, and preK–12 strategies for organizing and sharing student progress with the broader community. Philosophical influences of Reggio Emilia, TAB, IB, and AP will also be discussed.

    Wendy Robbins

    Atelierista, Ashley Hall School, Charleston, SC

    Wendy Robbins has worked in the early childhood field for over 20 years, serving as a teacher, program owner, and now atelierista at Ashley Hall School in Charleston, SC, where she works with children ages 2 through kindergarten. Wendy holds an Med in Fine Arts and the Regio Approach, and a BA in Children’s Fine Arts. She has a particular interest in music and movement as languages and incorporates these experiences as opportunities for creative expression and project work.

    Tina Hirsig

    K–6 Art Educator, Ashley Hall School, Charleston, SC

    Tina Hirsig earned a BS in Education from Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois, and a MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College’s self-designed graduate program. Tina’s degree has combined education philosophy and practices with interdisciplinary art. Today her teaching studio is choice-based (TAB) with an emphasis on student growth for K–6.

    Michelle Cobb

    AP Studio Art Reader; Art Educator and Art Chair, Georgetown Day School, Washington, D.C.

    Michelle Cobb began her career as a designer for Time Life and later became the first Black art director for Sports Illustrated. She holds an MFA from George Washington University and a BA from Skidmore College. Currently serving as the art chair at Georgetown Day School, she has been teaching art for over 25 years. Michelle’s graphic design work has also been acquired by Stanford University’s Black Graphic Design Artist Initiative.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/17/2024 at 7:00 PM (EDT)

    [April 17, 2024 | 7pm ET] This webinar will focus on various ways choice can be implemented in the classroom through the structure of curriculum, digital spaces, physical environments, and classroom routines. We will share examples of skill builders, boot camps, and thematic-based challenges, and strategies to structure student-facing learning management systems and physical stations for different materials to engage students in their own learning journeys. You will also learn simple yet effective classroom routines to promote student autonomy and success.


     

    image

    Structure for Success in a Choice-Driven Classroom

    Wednesday, April 17, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    This webinar will focus on various ways choice can be implemented in the classroom through the structure of curriculum, digital spaces, physical environments, and classroom routines. We will share examples of skill builders, boot camps, and thematic-based challenges, and strategies to structure student-facing learning management systems and physical stations for different materials to engage students in their own learning journeys. You will also learn simple yet effective classroom routines to promote student autonomy and success.

    Janine Campbell

    Visual Arts Teacher, Byron Center Public Schools, Michigan

    Janine Campbell has been teaching students in a middle school classroom since 2004. Her students have received local and national recognition in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, and she was honored as the Michigan Art Education Association Middle Level Educator of the Year in 2015, and the National Art Education Association Western Region Middle Level Educator of the Year in 2015. She has also received the Artsonia Leadership Award in 2019, and the MACUL Innovative Teacher of the Year Award in 2020.

    Stevie Ballow

    Art Educator and TAB Studio Director, Shady Oak Primary School, Richmond, TX

    Stevie Ballow has been teaching art for over 20 years. She is currently the TAB Studio Director at Shady Oak Primary School in Richmond, Texas, and she has presented on creativity and artmaking at education, art, and disaster recovery conferences nationwide. With a degree in biomedical engineering, Ballow uses her expertise to teach students how to "think like artists."

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/06/2024 at 7:00 PM (EST)

    [March 6, 2024 | 7pm ET] Join us as we explore drawing in the 21st-century classroom. From analog to digital arts, see examples and hear from educators who teach drawing to advance artmaking and communications skills to help students capture real and imagined worlds. As part of this discussion, we’ll also dive into how the methods and mindsets of sketchnoting can help learners of all ages build confidence with new and effective ways to absorb and manage information.


     

    image

    A Sketchy Webinar: Developing Student Drawing Skills in a Digital Age 

    Wednesday, March 6, 2024 | 7–8pm ET
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Join us as we explore drawing in the 21st-century classroom. From analog to digital arts, see examples and hear from educators who teach drawing to advance artmaking and communications skills to help students capture real and imagined worlds. As part of this discussion, we’ll also dive into how the methods and mindsets of sketchnoting can help learners of all ages build confidence with new and effective ways to absorb and manage information.

    Manuel Herrera

    Learning and Development Specialist, Washington University in St. Louis

    Manuel Herrera is visual thinker, sketchnoter, designer, and educator. For the past 20 years Herrera has used his passion for education, sketching, and creativity to build workshops and design talks that bring out the inner creative in everyone. His events focus on play and process to help students build confidence, as well as practice routines centered on thinking and creativity.

    Jane Montero

    Art Educator, Dexter Community Schools

    Jane Montero has taught middle-level art for 33 years. She is the President of the Michigan Art Education Association and a graduate of NAEA’s School for Art Leaders. Montero received the Outstanding Teaching Award from NAEA’s Art & Media Technology Interest Group in 2023, and she was also the recipient of Michigan’s Middle Level Art Educator of the Year Award, and the National Middle Level Art Educator of the Year Award in 2021–2022.

    Matt Young

    Visual Arts Educator and Art Chair, Pickerington Central High School

    Matt Young serves as the visual arts chair and is a past president of the Ohio Art Education Association. Matt is a noted speaker and has presented at the NAEA National Convention, for The Art of Education, and at various other educational conferences around the country. In addition, he has written articles for Davis Publications, NAEA, The Art of Education, and the Ohio Department of Education.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    [February 22, 2024] The session begins with an engaging presentation by Phillip Boutté Jr. and Mike Uwandi of 9B Collective, followed by an interactive Q and A session facilitated by National Art Honor Society (NAHS) and National Junior Art Honor Society (NJAHS) students.

    National Art Honor Society Connections: Open Studio Conversations with 9B Collective
    Thursday, February 22, 2024 
    Cost: FREE for NAEA Members 

    The session begins with an engaging presentation by Phillip Boutté Jr. and Mike Uwandi of 9B Collective, followed by an interactive Q and A session facilitated by National Art Honor Society (NAHS) and National Junior Art Honor Society (NJAHS) students.

    Sponsors are encouraged to share 9B Collective's artwork and biography with students before viewing the on demand event. These resources are visible upon registering under the "Handouts" tab above.

    Disclaimer: This video presentation briefly depicts nudity. The image is presented between 39:35-39:55 (nude digital female model). Viewer discretion is advised.

    Please note that this on demand event is available only to NAEA Members and that it does not grant NAEA professional learning credit. 

    Aryona Gunter

    Wisconsin

    Oswin Colley

    Alabama

    Jace Walker

    Delaware

    Dailyn Paul

    Wisconsin

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [February 7, 2024] Conduct an accessibility audit in your classroom! Unpack contemporary understandings of disabilities and how to apply these practices in all areas of your teaching while taking a critical look at your syllabus, curriculum, lesson plans, materials, tools, techniques, and classroom space and design. The visual arts classroom can be a unique space for valuing disabilities and differences, and this webinar will focus on creating an inclusive educational environment by learning to apply the principles of universal design, interdependence, and allyship. Leave with a fresh perspective along with the tools you need to ensure your instruction is equitable and accessible to all learners.


     

    image

    Helping Students With Disabilities Thrive in the Art Room

    Wednesday, February 7, 2024 
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    Conduct an accessibility audit in your classroom! Unpack contemporary understandings of disabilities and how to apply these practices in all areas of your teaching while taking a critical look at your syllabus, curriculum, lesson plans, materials, tools, techniques, and classroom space and design. The visual arts classroom can be a unique space for valuing disabilities and differences, and this webinar will focus on creating an inclusive educational environment by learning to apply the principles of universal design, interdependence, and allyship. Leave with a fresh perspective along with the tools you need to ensure your instruction is equitable and accessible to all learners.  

    Mikaela Bachmann

    PhD Candidate; Art Educator, Teaching Fellow & Lecturer, Keller Collegiate Academy & The University of North Texas

    Mikaela Bachmann is a teaching fellow and guest lecturer at the University of North Texas, and president-elect of the Art in Special Education (ASE) NAEA Interest Group. As an art educator she received an innovative teaching award for developing a unified arts program in her district. She holds an MA, BFA, and Art K–12 Teacher Certification, and her research critically examines ableist practices inherent in public education by offering the arts as a tool for reimagining (dis)ability.  

    Betty Siegel

    Director, Office of Accessibility and VSA, Kennedy Center

    Betty Siegel is an expert in disability, arts, employment, education, and cultural practices. She leads an international network with 1,600 members, as well as LEAD®, which convenes over 750 accessibility professionals. She is a respected keynote speaker, lecturer, and trainer on disability rights, ADA/504 compliance, and access accommodations. She acquired her JD in 2009 and created the Access Advisory Group in 2021.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    [January 25, 2024] Join us for a conversation on how research lives in our practice as educators and how it translates to K–12 settings through professional learning at the district level as well as the preparation of preservice educators. Presented by three members of the NAEA Research Commission, their shared experiences will highlight how the Commission actively promotes and engages a wide range of topics for empowering practice, advocacy, and dialogue among a range of education environments to build networks and foster collaborations.

    NAEA Open Studio Conversation: Finding Research—Connecting K12 to the Research Network 
    Thursday, January 25, 2024
    Cost: FREE!

    Join us for a conversation on how research lives in our practice as educators and how it translates to K12 settings through professional learning at the district level as well as the preparation of preservice educators. Presented by three members of the NAEA Research Commission, their shared experiences will highlight how the Commission actively promotes and engages a wide range of topics for empowering practice, advocacy, and dialogue among a range of education environments to build networks and foster collaborations.   

    Please note that participation in this live event or recording does not include NAEA professional learning credit. 

    Tina M. Atkinson

    Elementary Art Teacher, Percy Priest Elementary School, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, Nashville, TN

    Tina M. Atkinson has taught elementary visual arts in Nashville for the past 26 years at Percy Priest Elementary. She has served as an art education adjunct at Belmont University, hosting over 20 university interns. Tina has received awards from national, state, and local organizations for her work. She holds degrees in art education, curriculum and instruction, and leadership and professional practice, and she is National Board Certified in Early/Middle Childhood Visual Art. Her research interests include authentic assessment, student voice, and research-focused instructional design in the elementary art classroom, as well as exploring aspects of how art educator professional identity is developed over the educational life cycle of the individual for the purpose of identifying barriers to the profession. Having recently taken ownership of researcher as part of her own professional identity, Tina strives to empower other early and middle childhood practitioners to embrace research as part of their own practice.  

     

    Gino Molfino

    Fine Arts Coordinator, Howard County Public School System, Columbia, MD

    Gino Molfino has served as an artist, teacher, advocate, and education leader for the Howard County Public School System for over 20 years. He has collaborated to develop state, national, and district fine arts policies and practices that cultivate innovation in public education programming, curriculum development, and professional learning for educators that honor the teacher as an artist and promote contemporary practices in artmaking. As the current coordinator of fine arts for the Howard County Public School System, Gino is responsible for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the fine arts curricula, assessment materials, professional learning, and instructional supports for over 200 preK12 fine arts (art, dance, theatre) educators in the district. 

    Amy Pfeiler-Wunder

    Interim Associate Dean College of Visual and Performing Arts, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA

    Amy Pfeiler-Wunder currently serves as the interim associate dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Kutztown University. She received her PhD in teaching and learningart from the University of Iowa. Prior to joining higher education, she taught and made art alongside preK9 students in various settings. Her work examines the impact of intersectionality on one’s professional identity and positionality with keen attention to views of the learners and curriculum creation. In addition, Amy explores how transdisciplinary studies have the ability to dissolve hierarchical boundaries between disciplines to illuminate the transformative power of integration. She is active in the National Art Education Association (NAEA) as the Chair of the Research Commission, a former Higher Education Division Director on the NAEA Board of Directors, and the cofounder of the Professional Learning Through Research working group. In 2017, she received the Outstanding Higher Education Art Educator Award from PAEA.   

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    [January 16, 2024] In this Open Studio Conversation, NAEA welcomes featured presenter Jeffrey Conger, professor of graphic design at Montana State University and cofounder of the university’s Dyslexia & Innovation Symposium. Jeffrey will explore the skills and portfolio strategies that help students pursue higher education opportunities in graphic design and media arts, career options for students considering these pathways, and the value of exploring higher education opportunities in unexpected locations. He’ll also talk about the value of welcoming nontraditional and neurodiverse students into art and digital media programs in both secondary and higher education. Joining Jeffrey is Michele Dick, business development manager for education at Wacom and an education veteran with 21+ years of classroom and administrative experience with Evergreen Public Schools in Vancouver, Washington. Wacom device giveaways will be announced at the end of the conversation!

    NAEA Open Studio Conversations:  Discovering Successful Creative Career Pathways for All
    Skills, Portfolios, and Career Directions for All Art & Media Students, Including Those Navigating Neurodiversity
    Tuesday, January 16, 2024
    Cost: FREE!

    In this Open Studio Conversation, NAEA welcomes featured presenter Jeffrey Conger, professor of graphic design at Montana State University and cofounder of the university’s Dyslexia & Innovation Symposium. Jeffrey will explore the skills and portfolio strategies that help students pursue higher education opportunities in graphic design and media arts, career options for students considering these pathways, and the value of exploring higher education opportunities in unexpected locations. He’ll also talk about the value of welcoming nontraditional and neurodiverse students into art and digital media programs in both secondary and higher education. Joining Jeffrey is Michele Dick, education specialist at Wacom and an education veteran with 21+ years of classroom and administrative experience with Evergreen Public Schools in Vancouver, Washington. 

    BONUS! Wacom will give away Intuos wireless tablets to two lucky Open Studio Conversation attendees! To be eligible, you must attend the live Open Studio Conversation and winners will be announced via email following the broadcast. Wacom Intuos wireless pen tablets are designed for individuals and beginners interested in drawing, painting or photo editing in a digital space. Whether you’re looking to try out the pressure-sensitive pen, create a stylish design, or explore the included software and online tutorials, Wacom Intuos has everything you need to start an exciting digitally creative journey.

    Presented by:

    image


    Please note that participation in this live event or recording does not include NAEA professional learning credit. 

    Jeffrey Conger

    Professor
    Co-founder Dyslexia & Innovation Symposium
    Montana State University

    Jeffrey Conger is a professor of graphic design and co-founder of the Dyslexia & Innovation symposium at Montana State University in Bozeman. As a lifelong dyslexic and outspoken advocate, Jeffrey has developed innovative pedagogy through experimental pilot courses for neurodivergent individuals with learning differences. 

    Through his client-based scholarly creative, Jeffrey actively works as a professional designer, photographer, and author who specializes in automotive culture. Known for his candid storytelling and journalistic style, his content has been published regionally, nationally, and internationally through the mass-media giants Motor Trend Group, TEN: The Enthusiast Network, Source Interlink, and Egmont Publishing.

    In addition, Jeffrey is the recipient of several prestigious awards Presidential Leadership Faculty Fellowship, the Cox Family Award for Creative Scholarship and Teaching, the Dean’s Excellence Award for Integration, and the Founder’s Day Award for Teaching Excellence. He is an invited speaker to the national AIGA design conference, presenter at AIGA educators conference, along with being an American Advertising Federation gold and silver Addy award winner.

    Michele Dick

    Education Specialist
    Wacom

    Michele Dick is the Business Development Manager for Education at Wacom. Her work encompasses providing profressional development for educators across the U.S., in the use of Wacom’s solutions for art, media arts, CTE, and core curriculum teaching and learning. Prior to joining the Wacom Education team, Michele spent nearly 21 years as an educator with Evergreen Public Schools in Vancouver, Washington, where she served as an elementary educator, a technology specialist, and digital learning coordinator. Michele earned her Master’s Degree in Teaching from Washington State University in Vancouver. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [January 10, 2024] This presentation explores the impact of artificial intelligence on today’s art education practices. It also provides suggestions for art educators interested in the incorporation of AI technology into art curricula, or those concerned about ethical issues involving the use of AI. Recently, many educators, engineers, and administrators have addressed the need to prepare for the changes AI may cause, but many art educators may also feel unprepared for these changes as they pertain to the intersection of AI, visual arts, and creativity. Using machines as a creative agency is a relatively new concept, and, in some ways, AI-generated art challenges traditional definitions of creativity. In this presentation, three art educators who teach in secondary and postsecondary education settings will share their thoughts and experiences related to AI’s impact on K–16 education. The webinar will introduce the following: 1. How high school students use AI technology in art classrooms. 2. How preservice art teachers explore the possibilities and risks of AI. 3. How college foundations students are encouraged to reexamine the role of creativity in artmaking processes and push creative boundaries. In addition, the presenters will examine the ethics and risks teachers and students should be aware of when utilizing AI tools.

    image

    Artificial Intelligence and Art Education, Part II: Ethics and Impact

    Wednesday, January 10, 2024
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    This presentation explores the impact of artificial intelligence on today’s art education practices. It also provides suggestions for art educators interested in the incorporation of AI technology into art curricula, or those concerned about ethical issues involving the use of AI. Recently, many educators, engineers, and administrators have addressed the need to prepare for the changes AI may cause, but many art educators may also feel unprepared for these changes as they pertain to the intersection of AI, visual arts, and creativity. Using machines as a creative agency is a relatively new concept, and, in some ways, AI-generated art challenges traditional definitions of creativity. In this presentation, three art educators who teach in secondary and postsecondary education settings will share their thoughts and experiences related to AI’s impact on K–16 education.

    The webinar will introduce the following:

    1. How high school students use AI technology in art classrooms.

    2. How preservice art teachers explore the possibilities and risks of AI.

    3. How college foundations students are encouraged to reexamine the role of creativity in artmaking processes and push creative boundaries.  

    In addition, the presenters will examine the ethics and risks teachers and students should be aware of when utilizing AI tools. 

    Megan Fowler

    Ed.S in Art Education; Art Educator, Seckinger High School, Buford, Georgia

    As a veteran teacher for 14 years, Megan Fowler is an art education specialist who currently teaches AP Studio, AP Art History, Graphic Design, and Digital Design at Seckinger High School in Buford, Georgia. Fowler was awared the Archer High School Teacher of the Year in 2018, and she was also a recipient of the Piedmont University Alumni Pacesetter Award in 2019. 

    Borim Song

    Professor of Art Education, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina

    Borim Song is a professor of art education at the School of Art and Design of East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. She holds her EdD and EdM from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City. Her scholarly interests include new technologies for art education, online education practice, and contemporary art in K–12 curriculum.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    [December 6, 2023] We are at the beginning of a new phase of creativity, led by artists who collaborate with machines and feed algorithms with data. Artists employ artificial intelligence (AI) to generate visual images, sounds, and animations using chatbots, neural networks, and prompt-based software. However, these AI-based tools, techniques, and processes are just the beginning of a new trend that could initiate fundamental changes in the way artists and designers approach and produce art. AI artists are challenging copyright and intellectual property laws that don’t currently address the evolving language and aesthetics of art created all or in part using machine learning algorithms. With this greater computing power and the development of future programs, the limits of such output are merely the limits within our own imagination. But as AI becomes more prominent, not just across the arts but across most areas of life and work, what does this mean for artists and the future of art education? To answer this question, our presenters will talk about the implications of AI in the arts to better understand the technology, as well as its widespread adoption and use.

    image

    Artificial Intelligence and Art Education, Part I: A New Approach to Creativity

    Wednesday, December 6, 2023
    FREE for NAEA members; $49 for nonmembers

    We are at the beginning of a new phase of creativity, led by artists who collaborate with machines and feed algorithms with data. Artists employ artificial intelligence (AI) to generate visual images, sounds, and animations using chatbots, neural networks, and prompt-based software. However, these AI-based tools, techniques, and processes are just the beginning of a new trend that could initiate fundamental changes in the way artists and designers approach and produce art. AI artists are challenging copyright and intellectual property laws that don’t currently address the evolving language and aesthetics of art created all or in part using machine learning algorithms. With this greater computing power and the development of future programs, the limits of such output are merely the limits within our own imagination. But as AI becomes more prominent, not just across the arts but across most areas of life and work, what does this mean for artists and the future of art education? To answer this question, our presenters will talk about the implications of AI in the arts to better understand the technology, as well as its widespread adoption and use.

    Nettrice Gaskins

    Assistant Director, Lesley STEAM Learning Lab

    Nettrice Gaskins is an African American digital artist, academic, cultural critic, and advocate of STEAM fields. She earned a BFA in Computer Graphics with Honors from Pratt Institute in 1992, an MFA in Art and Technology from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1994, and she received a doctorate in Digital Media from Georgia Tech in 2014. 

    Matt Dombrowski

    Associate Professor UCF & Limbitless Solutions Creative Director

    Associate Professor Matt Dombrowski is Creative Director at Limbitless Solutions Inc, a nonprofit organization within the University of Central Florida (UCF). He leads an interdisciplinary team to develop 3D printed, visually expressive bionic arms and training video games for children with limb differences to properly utilize their prosthetics. His work has been featured by Adobe, Autodesk, Unity, Epic, Smithsonian American Art Museum, GDC, SXSW EDU, and Gates Foundation.

    Twitter Social Media Handle: @dombrowskiucf & @limbitless3d

    Tim Needles

    Artist; Educator; Author

    Tim Needles is an artist, educator and author of STEAM Power: Infusing Art Into Your STEM Curriculum. He teaches art/media at Smithtown School District, is a TEDx Talk speaker, and his work has been featured on NPR, in the New York Times, Columbus Museum of Art, Norman Rockwell Museum, Alexandria Museum of Art, Katonah Museum of Art, and Cape Cod Museum of Art. He’s the recipient of ISTE’s Technology in Action Award and Creativity Award, NAEA’s Eastern Region Art Educator Award & AET Outstanding Teaching Award, and The Rauschenberg Power of Art Award. He’s a National Geographic Certified Teacher, PBS Digital Innovator, a NASA Solar System Ambassador, an ISTE Arts & Technology and STEM PLN leader, NAEA ArtEdTech interest Group leader, and Adobe Creative Educator and Education Leader Emeritus. He’s active on social media at @timneedles.

    Upon completion of this NAEA webinar, you may earn 1 hour of professional development credit as designated by NAEA. Once the webinar is completed, you may view/print a Certification of Participation under the "Contents" tab. You may also print a transcript of all webinars attended under the "Dashboard" link in the right sidebar section of the page.  

    Clock hours provided upon completion of any NAEA professional learning program are granted for participation in an organized professional learning experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction, and can be used toward continuing education credit in most states. It is the responsibility of the participant to verify acceptance by professional governing authorities in their area.